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The Great Happy News

Like others, I yearned for “it” and attempted to seek personal salvation, a rich sense of fulfillment, and a guiding light by pursuing a dogged focus on organized religions, romantic relationships, and career advancement. And, like others, these attempts failed, leaving me with a deeper emptiness and confusion. While I knew each of the subjects of my pursuit had its life-optimizing merits, my experience was that depending too heavily on these for personal worth and happiness was a recipe for disappointment.

My yearning and searching finally led me to “it,” a feeling of inner peace, direction, and awareness via a path that consisted of a rational and what some might consider a mystical approach. The rational aspect of this path I found by way of The 10 Human Elements along with other analysis tools that I will explore and elaborate on in future posts. However, in this post I will discuss the more mystical aspect of this path: meditation. As many have discovered, meditation is a way to become mindful, which provides the ability to live more fully in the present. There are many guides available to introduce newcomers to the practice of meditation. My goal is not to add another guide to the list but to describe my personal experience with meditation and share a few links to some of the scientifically agreed upon rewards.

For quite a few years, I knew of meditation, and it was suggested by friends on multiple occasions that I try it. However, I was timid and almost even afraid to start. It seemed, somehow, too complex. Then, I suppose, the internal confusion and emotional pain I was feeling was finally enough for me to give meditation a go.

When I first started meditation, it was not the easiest thing I had ever tried, but it also wasn’t the hardest. It took some time and patience before I started to feel rewarded by the practice. When I did start to get some traction from meditation, I think The Lone Bellow sing it best: “then came the morning.” It was as if dawn had broken through a deep and shadowy forest inside me, a kind of morning light that warmed the inner depths of my soul.

I’m guessing, like most things, how one experiences meditation is relatively unique to the individual. With that said, here are a few of mine:

If you liked learning about my experience and expanded awareness via meditation, you may find interest in the Evolving Results. Also, here are a few links to view the benefits of meditation outside my own personal experience:

Best,
Nathan Phil Steele